What other options do people have for hair loss?
There are many options and alternative cosmetic treatments for hair loss. Some of these are listed here and include hair-fiber powders, hairpieces, synthetic wigs, human hair wigs, hair extensions, hair weaves, laser, and surgery.

  • Hair-fiber powders: Colored, powdery fiber sprinkles are commercially available and may work really well to cover up thinning hair areas. These colored sprinkles have special properties that help them attach to hair and give a fuller appearance. Toppik is one manufacturer of these products and can be found online. These cosmetic products are available without a prescription, are fairly inexpensive ($20-$40 range), and quite safe with minimal risk. Often these may be used in addition to medical treatments like LLLT, and hair transplants, and they are a great temporary measure to tide you over for special occasions.
  • Hairpieces: Among the time-honored ways to add hair temporarily are hairpieces or hair weaving, in which a mesh is attached to your remaining hair and artificial or human hair of similar color and texture is woven with existing hair. Quality varies considerably with price; also, hairpieces and weaves may stretch, oxidize, and loosen.
  • Surgery or hair transplants: Surgical hair restoration approaches include various versions of hair transplantation (taking hair from the back and putting it near the front) or scalp reduction (cutting away bald areas and stitching the rest together). Transplant procedures have improved greatly in recent years. They can produce much more attractive and natural-looking results than older methods that sometimes leave a “checkerboard” or hair plug look. Many transplant patients now take Propecia to maintain or keep what they’ve transplanted. When considering a hair transplant, check the surgeon’s credentials and experience carefully. Micrografts are some of the newest techniques whereby surgeons transplant single one to two hair follicles. Hair transplants may be very expensive and time-consuming procedures ranging widely anywhere from $1,000-$20,000, depending on the number of hair grafts transplanted. Typically 500 or more hairs may be transplanted in a session.“Low level light therapy” or “low level laser therapy”. Low level laser therapy is a safe form of light treatment. It is being used to treat the genetic forms of hair loss common in men and women, androgenetic alopecia or pattern balding.The hair growth cycle consists of three phases: growth (anagen phase), resting (telogen phase) and shedding (catagen phase). Hair loss in androgenetic alopecia depends on a testosterone derivative in the skin, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Low level laser therapy is believed to increase blood flow in the scalp and stimulate metabolism in catagen or telogen follicles, resulting in the production of anagen hair.In theory:
    • The photons of light act on cytochrome C oxidase leading to the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This is converted to cyclic AMP in the hair follicle cells, releasing energy and stimulating metabolic processes necessary for hair growth.
    • Release of nitric oxide from cells leads to increased vascularisation to the scalp distributing nutrients and oxygen to the hair roots.
    • Excessive build-up of DHT is prevented.

    Low level laser therapy can be used in both men and women and no adverse effects have been reported. LLLT is clean and painless. Low level laser hair therapy is relatively inexpensive and requires minimal time commitment. Hair growth will occur on the top of the head/crown and along the hairline of forehead as well as fill in your bald spots. Improvement is reported in some users after 6 to 20 weeks of use, with reduced hair fall and noticeable hair growth. All results vary from person to person.

How do people prevent hair loss?
Hair-loss prevention involves several factors depending on the underlying cause. Good hair hygiene with regular shampooing is a basic step. Good nutrition, especially adequate levels of iron and vitamin B, is helpful. Treatment of underlying medical conditions like thyroid disease, anemia, and hormonal imbalances may useful in prevention.

REFERENCES:
Bolognia, Jean, Jorizzo, Joseph, and Rapini, Ronald. Dermatology. Philadelphia: Mosby Elsevier, 2008.

Han, A., and P. Mirmirani. “Clinical approach to the patient with alopecia.” Semin Cutan Med Surg. 25 (2006): 11-23.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/27/2014

Source(s): http://www.medicinenet.com/hair_loss/